Are We Happy or Holy?

God doesn’t concern Himself with happy people; He concerns Himself with holy people.

The problem with culture today is that everyone is too concerned with happiness. Just be happy. Do whatever makes you happy. As long as you’re happy. But happiness really isn’t the problem. The problem is how we, as a culture, have elevated our happiness to our highest priority. We gage whether or not we should or shouldn’t do something or engage in something based on whether or not it will bring us happiness.

Where is our concern for holiness? When are we going to start striving for a standard of holiness? God doesn’t concern Himself with happy people; He concerns Himself with holy people. Does God want His children to be happy? Yes, I believe so. However, make no mistake, God will never elevate our happiness above our holiness; because it is our holiness that sets us apart as Christ-followers.

Holiness, not happiness, is the chief end of man. —Oswald Chambers

Happiness is an emotion. Like all emotions, it can easily change and it certainly doesn’t last. What may have made us happy at one point may now be the cause of great sadness and regret. Happiness is fleeting. Holiness, on the other hand, is a state of being. Translated from the Greek word hágios, holiness is defined as “set apart, holy, sacred.” As Christians, we are meant to be set apart for the purposes of God; different from those who belong to the world. We are not to compromise our holiness, our sacred purpose, for a taste of the fleeting happiness this world has to offer.

If you want to be popular, preach happiness. If you want to unpopular, preach holiness. —Vance Havner

Sure, sin is fun and you’re happy in it…until it takes you to a place where you don’t want to be, never thought you would be, and can’t get out of. Thankfully, there is a God who is able and willing to reach into the deepest and darkest of places and pull out anyone who is ready to leave and pursue a higher calling—a call to live holy. Living a holy life doesn’t guarantee a life of happiness, but God has promised His followers something better in return: Joy. Joy is just one fruit resulting from living a holy life (Gal. 5:22-23). Joy trumps happiness because joy is a state of mind and being; not a mere, ever-changing emotion.

As children of God, we are called to be conformed to His image. He is a holy God and tells us to “Be holy, for I am holy” (Lev. 20:71 Pet. 1:16). We, in our justification as Christians, are to be sanctified into the holy image of God; striving to be blameless before Him. We, as believers are even told that our holiness will sometimes be at the expense of our happiness (Heb. 12:7-11), but we are also assured that it will be worth it in the end.

For God did not call us to be impure, but to live a holy life. —1 Thess. 4:7

As obedient children, do not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance. But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: “Be holy, because I am holy.” —1 Peter 1:14-16

holiness-is-mandatory