A Whisper in a Manger

“In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God” (John 1:1, NIV).

This is the very Word that spoke the universe, and all of creation, into existence. For some reason, I have a difficult time picturing that moment as being anything other than loud and explosive and filled with majesty. I imagine God’s voice booming and things coming into existence almost as quickly as He speaks. It is the voice of God thundering throughout an empty void while creation obeys His words. The Word shouted and creation bowed in worship.

“The Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us” (John 1:14a).

The same Word that once echoed throughout creation now quietly, in the still of the night, made His way down to earth and became Immanuel—God with us. The Word that once shouted everything into being came to earth as a human being, and I imagine this time was more of a whisper. The Son of God came quietly in the night, swaddled in cloth, and whimpered the soft cries of an infant. The Christ child made an entrance into the very world He had spoken into existence, and His entrance was anything other than mighty and majestic. It was meek and humble, where the only room for Him to even lay His head was in a stable manger. God leaned down from His throne in Heaven and whispered intimately to earth. God whispered salvation to all of humanity through a baby—Jesus, the Son of God.

Was there a moment, known only to God, when all the stars held their breath, when the galaxies paused in their dance for a fraction of a second, and the Word, who had called it all into being, went with all of His love into the womb of a young girl? —Madeleine L’Engle

“We have seen his glory, the glory of the one and only Son, who came from the Father, full of grace and truth” (John 1:14b).

The thing about whispering is that it requires intimacy. It requires one to be up close and personal with another. When the Father sent His Son to earth, He chose the most intimate way—through the whisper of a baby born in Bethlehem. This shows just how intimate and close God was willing to bring His creation to Him. Or, rather, how God so yearned for intimacy with His creation that He left His heavenly throne, took on flesh, and went to earth to dwell among them as one of them.

One might expect a king to come with horse and chariot and trumpets heralding; with his full majesty on display. However, our King chose to come lowly, humbly, and quietly. All of His glory and majesty was tucked away—covered by flesh—blending Him in with sinful humanity. God came down to earth, to an insignificant city called Bethlehem, to a manger in a stable; and to the baby lying there, God whispered salvation’s name: Jesus. He is the One who will save His people from their sins (Matt 1:21).

When someone speaks in a whisper, you have to get very close to hear. In fact, you have to put your ear near the person’s mouth. We lean toward a whisper, and that’s what God wants. The goal of hearing the heavenly Father’s voice isn’t just hearing His voice; it’s intimacy with Him. That’s why He speaks in a whisper. He wants to be as close to us as is divinely possible! He loves us, likes us, that much. —Mark Batterson

Still today, I believe that God is more interested in whispering to us rather than shouting at us. God wants to have the kind of intimate relationship with us that allows Him to lean in closely and whisper softly into our hearts. We should yearn for a relationship with God that allows us to feel that still, small voice and know that it is from our heavenly Father. It is a connection between His love and our hearts. After all, this is the entire reason for the Word becoming flesh and dwelling among us—to allow us a connection with God like never before.

Merry Christmas!

Are We Happy or Holy?

God doesn’t concern Himself with happy people; He concerns Himself with holy people.

The problem with culture today is that everyone is too concerned with happiness. Just be happy. Do whatever makes you happy. As long as you’re happy. But happiness really isn’t the problem. The problem is how we, as a culture, have elevated our happiness to our highest priority. We gage whether or not we should or shouldn’t do something or engage in something based on whether or not it will bring us happiness.

Where is our concern for holiness? When are we going to start striving for a standard of holiness? God doesn’t concern Himself with happy people; He concerns Himself with holy people. Does God want His children to be happy? Yes, I believe so. However, make no mistake, God will never elevate our happiness above our holiness; because it is our holiness that sets us apart as Christ-followers.

Holiness, not happiness, is the chief end of man. —Oswald Chambers

Happiness is an emotion. Like all emotions, it can easily change and it certainly doesn’t last. What may have made us happy at one point may now be the cause of great sadness and regret. Happiness is fleeting. Holiness, on the other hand, is a state of being. Translated from the Greek word hágios, holiness is defined as “set apart, holy, sacred.” As Christians, we are meant to be set apart for the purposes of God; different from those who belong to the world. We are not to compromise our holiness, our sacred purpose, for a taste of the fleeting happiness this world has to offer.

If you want to be popular, preach happiness. If you want to unpopular, preach holiness. —Vance Havner

Sure, sin is fun and you’re happy in it…until it takes you to a place where you don’t want to be, never thought you would be, and can’t get out of. Thankfully, there is a God who is able and willing to reach into the deepest and darkest of places and pull out anyone who is ready to leave and pursue a higher calling—a call to live holy. Living a holy life doesn’t guarantee a life of happiness, but God has promised His followers something better in return: Joy. Joy is just one fruit resulting from living a holy life (Gal. 5:22-23). Joy trumps happiness because joy is a state of mind and being; not a mere, ever-changing emotion.

As children of God, we are called to be conformed to His image. He is a holy God and tells us to “Be holy, for I am holy” (Lev. 20:71 Pet. 1:16). We, in our justification as Christians, are to be sanctified into the holy image of God; striving to be blameless before Him. We, as believers are even told that our holiness will sometimes be at the expense of our happiness (Heb. 12:7-11), but we are also assured that it will be worth it in the end.

For God did not call us to be impure, but to live a holy life. —1 Thess. 4:7

As obedient children, do not conform to the evil desires you had when you lived in ignorance. But just as he who called you is holy, so be holy in all you do; for it is written: “Be holy, because I am holy.” —1 Peter 1:14-16

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